October 20, 2017

What is the Cloud?

Cloud computing on blackboard Discussions about the cloud have been going on for several years. However, even though it is a term many use, there also seems to be a lot of confusion about what it actually means, both in terms of trying to define it too narrowly or too nebulously.

In the simplest sense, the cloud is a collection of networking and server infrastructure that is “out there” as opposed to the “in here” like an organization’s local area network. One of the key characteristics of the cloud is that you can’t physically put your hands on it. However, just like clouds, the fact that you can’t touch them does not mean they are not real or have great purpose and value.

Anything you can do on an “in here” network you can do on the “out there” network of the cloud. You can store files and folders and databases. You can run servers and desktop computers. You can launch and run programs/applications and interact with them. You can secure and encrypt and backup and protect things the exact same way you would on an “in here” network.

The two biggest drivers of the cloud are:

  1. You only pay for exactly what you need and use. With a physical network, you make decisions and buy hardware and software based on 5-7 year projections. With cloud networks, you can size the resources (space, servers, processing, memory, etc) up or down in less than 2 hours.
  2. Operation and maintenance are included. I’m yet to meet the business owner who will say they got into business because they really wanted to own a server closet. It has been a necessary component, but, for most owners, not an enjoyable expense or worry.

We’ll have more TechTalkTuesdays over the coming weeks discussing some of the terminology and providers of cloud services. We’ll also be discussing how small businesses are using cloud to improve their operations, expand business and save money.

We welcome your thoughts and questions.