December 17, 2017

3 Steps for Backup & Recovery

Back Up And Restore Keys For Data SecurityLast week included World Backup Day, a reminder that it is never wise to have only one copy of any important electronic data.  But data backup is really only one component toward the real goal of data recovery.  The very worse day to test the ability to restore is on the day you need to restore the data.

A Wall Street Journal article on March 31 included these important 3 steps from Jennifer Walzer, CEO of BUMI (Back Up My Info).

  1. Develop a backup AND recovery plan.  This primarily involves planning, documentation and organization.  What do we need the ability to restore?  Where will it be stored?  Who has responsibility for maintaining it?
  2. Determine your RTO (Recovery Time Objective).  This is different for each business but revolves around the questions of what system access is most critical to ongoing business operations and how long can we survive without it.  This drives the tools and strategy.  In general, the more you say “everything at once” the more expensive it will be.
  3. Test your plan: According to Walzer, “I’ve been in the industry for 20 years now and I can’t get over how many people say, ‘we have a backup plan, we’re okay,’ but they aren’t testing it to make sure what they think they’re doing will help them get up and running faster.”  Things change.  People come and go.  Applications get updated.  If recovery testing is not part of your ongoing technology planning your plan is incomplete.

Because recovery needs vary, Onsite Logic works with a number of different backup tools to fit these different needs.  These range from simple data-only backups to fully redundant fail-over systems including the ability to run the business from the cloud in a catastrophic event.

Let our IT consulting team work with your team to help develop your company’s Backup and Recovery Plan.  The time to plan is when things are working.